Anterior Cruciate Ligament – Advances in Reconstruction

Anterior Cruciate Ligament – Advances in Reconstruction
Anterior cruciate ligament injury is one of the more common sporting injuries affecting the knee seen by orthopaedic surgeons in South Australia. It can occur in all age groups, ranging from adolescence right through to older age. Whilst it most commonly occurs in those playing sports it can also occur as a result of car or motorbike accidents, falls or other more benign incidents.

Anterior cruciate ligament injury is one of the more common sporting injuries affecting the knee seen by orthopaedic surgeons in South Australia. It can occur in all age groups, ranging from adolescence right through to older age. Whilst it most commonly occurs in those playing sports it can also occur as a result of car or motorbike accidents, falls or other more benign incidents.

Deficiency of the anterior cruciate ligament can result in the knee becoming unstable which can prevent the patient from further participating in their chosen sports and also impacting upon other day to day activities such as walking on uneven surfaces, going up or down stairs, comfortably undertaking their normal work day and others. Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament can also be associated with other damage to the knee joint such as tears of the meniscus or other ligament injuries.

Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament is a procedure that aims to restore stability to the knee to prevent further damage. It does this by passing a graft through bony tunnels in both the femur and tibia. Hamstring tendons harvested through a 1-2 inch incision is the most commonly used type of graft by Adelaide orthopaedic surgeons. However in certain cases, especially revision surgery, other graft types may be used such as patella tendon and even donor tendons.

For more information about anterior cruciate ligament surgery as well as other sporting injuries affecting the knee please contact the surgeons at Adelaide Orthopaedic and Trauma Specialists.

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